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HIV 101 in ASL – 1 introduction


Hello hello! Welcome to HIV 101
in ASL video series! My name is: What are HIV 101 in ASL? It’s where we will talk about
topics related to HIV and AIDS. For instance, topics that will be covered are: What to do if you’re newly diagnosed? How to get tested for HIV/AIDS. Information about PrEP. How to have a safe sex while having HIV. Do I need to inform others about
my status as a HIV + person? And many more topics. Here we at DOP provide
following services: We translate from English to
ASL for information about HIV and AIDS. We also have a lot of brochures,
books, cards and many more from various AIDS organizations
across Ontario. For instance, CATIE, ACT, Casey House, and many more. We advocate for the rights
to have an equal access. for all of you deaf people with HIV. We talk to hospitals, clinics, and organizations
related to HIV/AIDS. We make sure that they provide
accessibility, interpreters, and many more. Any of you can ask us if needed,
and we’ll speak with the organizations. We also offer deaf people with HIV and AIDS
references for counselling service, hospitals, clinics, support groups,
support organizations, and many more. Also, we provide information in tactile ASL
for deafblind individuals. DOP’s office is at:
OAD, Ontario Association of the Deaf, office. But we do travel to various locations to meet
with deaf client and hearing organizations. Now, I will discuss the basics of
HIV and AIDS. Later, I will do a video with in-depth
scientific information about HIV and how it works. HIV is a virus that can make you sick. How? HIV fights against your
body’s immune system, weakening it. Your body’s immune system
is very important, because it fights against disease and illness,
preventing them from spreading in your body. You can have HIV without knowing it.
You may not look or feel sick for years. You still can pass the virus on to other people. That’s why it’s very important that you
get tested for HIV regularly, to make sure you don’t have it.
And if you do, so you can immediately start treatment. If you don’t start treatment for HIV,
don’t take medication for it, what will happen is that HIV will become AIDS. AIDS is a stage where your HIV
becomes overpowering and it really weakens your immune system. To the point where
you can easily become sick. And you could die from these sickness, because your immune system is too weak to fight off serious illness. Is there a cure for HIV?
No. But there are many people with HIV
who live a long and healthy life, well into old age. But, understand this, you must
take medications for HIV everyday. If you miss dosages, it can hurt you.
I will explain more about that in later video. It’s also very important to get treatments for HIV
because it’ll dramatically lower your risk of passing HIV to other people. If you do have a sex, it’s very important to make sure
that you use condom and follow safe sex procedure. I will talk more about that in future video. Who can get HIV?
Anyone. How is HIV passed onto
other person? Through five different body fluids: 1. Blood. 2. Semen.
That includes pre-cum. 3. Vaginal fluid. 4. Breast milk. and, 5. rectal fluid. How do these fluids enter other person’s body?: 1. Broken skin (cuts). 2. the opening of the penis. 3. the wet lining of the body, such as
the vagina, rectum, or foreskin. Can HIV pass through healthy, unbroken skin?
No. There are two main ways
that HIV can get passed: 1. Sex- if you don’t use protection
and don’t take HIV medication. I will explain more about that
in a future video, including PrEP. Another main way that HIV can
get passed on is: 2. Sharing needles, injected for drug use. So these two are the main ways that
HIV can be passed on. But there are other ways that
HIV can also be passed: Sharing needles or ink
to get a tattoo. Sharing acupuncture needles. Sharing needles or jewelry
to get a body piercing. To a fetus or baby during pregnancy,
birth or breastfeeding. I will explain more information about/for
HIV mothers and their children in a later video. HIV cannot be passed by: Talking, shaking hands, kissing, hugging,
working or eating with someone who has HIV, Sneezing, coughs, swimming pools, towels
or bed sheets, toilet seats or water fountains, Food, cups, spoons, forks, insects, nor animals. You cannot get HIV from all of these things. As for blood donation,
there is a very very low chance of getting HIV. This is because Canada is very committed
to screening and check all blood products for HIV. Now, I just explained the basics of HIV. I will go ahead translate the disclaimer
from English to ASL. DOP provide information resource to help
people living with HIV who wish to manage their own healthcare in partnership
with their care providers. Information accessed through or published
or provided by DOP, however, is not to be medical advice. DOP endeavour to provide the most
up-to-date and accurate information at the time of publication. Users relying solely on this information
do so entirely at their own risk. Any opinions expressed herein may
not reflect the policies or opinions of DOP and OAD or
any partners or funders. Information on safer drug use is
presented as a public health service to help people make healthier choices
to reduce the spread of HIV, viral hepatitis, and other infections. It is not intended to encourage or
promote the use or possession of illegal drugs. Ok awesome,
thank you so much for watching. I hope to see you again next time!

One Reply to “HIV 101 in ASL – 1 introduction”

  • Here's the transcription since I cannot add it to the description box.

    [Start Transcription:

    Hello hello!

    Welcome to HIV 101 in ASL video series! My name is: Carlisle Robinson.

    What are HIV 101 in ASL? It's where we will talk about topics related to HIV and AIDS. For instance, topics that will be covered are: What to do if you're newly diagnosed? How to get tested for HIV/AIDS. Information about PrEP. How to have a safe sex while having HIV. Do I need to inform others about my status as a HIV positive person? And many more topics.

    Here we at DOP provide following services: We translate from English to ASL for information about HIV and AIDS. We also have a lot of brochures, books, cards and many more from various AIDS organizations across Ontario. For instance, CAITE, ACT, Casey House, and many more. We advocate for the rights to have an equal access for all of you deaf people with HIV. We talk to hospitals, clinics, and organizations related to HIV/AIDS. We make sure that they provide accessibility, interpreters, and many more. Any of you can ask us if needed, and we'll speak with the organizations. We also offer deaf people with HIV and AIDS references for counselling service, hospitals, clinics, support groups, support organizations, and many more. Also, we provide information in tactile ASL for deafblind individuals.

    DOP's office is at: OAD, Ontario Association of the Deaf, office.

    [Image: Address: 2395 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON M2L 1A2.]

    But we do travel to various locations to meet with deaf client and hearing organizations.

    Now, I will discuss the basics of HIV and AIDS. Later, I will do a video with in-depth scientific information about HIV and how it works. HIV is a virus that can make you sick.

    [Image: HIV = Human immunodeficiency virus scrolls into the screen.]

    How? HIV fights against your body's immune system, weakening it. Your body's immune system is very important, because it fights against disease and illness, preventing them from spreading in your body.

    [Image: an illustration of a blue blob, representing immune system, beating up a green blob, representing virus.]

    You can have HIV without knowing it. You may not look or feel sick for years. You still can pass the virus on to other people. That's why it's very important that you get tested for HIV regularly, to make sure you don't have it. And if you do, so you can immediately start treatment. If you don't start treatment for HIV, don't take medication for it, what will happen is that HIV will become AIDS.

    [Image: AIDS = Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome scrolls onto the screen.]

    AIDS is a stage where your HIV becomes overpowering and it really weakens your immune system.

    [Image: an illustration of a blue blob, which is a smaller and weaker immune system. The blue blob is surrounded by many big and strong green blobs, which are virus.]

    To the point where you can easily become sick. And you could die from these sickness, because your immune system is too weak to fight off serious illness.

    Is there a cure for HIV? No. But there are many people with HIV who live a long and healthy life, well into old age. But, understand this, you must take medications for HIV everyday.

    [Image: an illustration of several different coloured pills.]

    If you miss dosages, it can hurt you.
    I will explain more about that in later video. It's also very important to get treatments for HIV because it’ll dramatically lower your risk of passing HIV to other people. If you do have a sex, it's very important to make sure that you use condom and follow safe sex procedure. I will talk more about that in future video.

    Who can get HIV? Anyone.

    How is HIV passed onto other person? Through five different body fluids:

    1. Blood. 2. Semen. That includes pre-cum 3. Vaginal fluid. 4. Breast milk. and, 5. Rectal fluid.

    How do these fluids enter other person’s body?:
    1. Broken skin (cuts).
    2. The opening of the penis.
    3. The wet lining of the body, such as
    the vagina, rectum, or foreskin.

    Can HIV pass through healthy, unbroken skin? No.

    There are two main ways that HIV can get passed:
    1. Sex- if you don't use protection and don't take HIV medication. I will explain more about that in a future video, including PrEP. Another main way that HIV can get passed on is:
    2. Sharing needles, injected for drug use.
    So these two are the main ways that HIV can be passed on.

    But there are other ways that HIV can also be passed:

    Sharing needles or ink to get a tattoo. [Picture: a tattoo inker.]

    Sharing acupuncture needles. [Picture: a relaxed light skinned feminine person gets acupuncture needles on her back.]

    Sharing needles or jewelry to get a body piercing. [Picture: a piercing gun.]

    To a fetus or baby during pregnancy, birth or breastfeeding. [Picture: a dark skinned mother cradling a sleeping baby.] I will explain more information about/for HIV mothers and their children in a later video.

    HIV cannot be passed by: Talking, shaking hands, kissing, hugging, working or eating with someone who has HIV, sneezing, coughs, swimming pools, towels or bed sheets, toilet seats or water fountains, food, cups, spoons, forks, insects, nor animals.

    [Image: a list of these things.]

    You cannot get HIV from all of these things.

    As for blood donation, there is a very very low chance of getting HIV. This is because Canada is very committed to screening and check all blood products for HIV.

    Now, I just explained the basics of HIV. I will go ahead translate the disclaimer from English to ASL. [Image: word ‘disclaimer’]

    “DOP provide information resource to help people living with HIV who wish to manage their own healthcare in partnership with their care providers. Information accessed through or published or provided by DOP, however, is not to be considered medical advice. DOP endeavour to provide the most up-to-date and accurate information at the time of publication. Users relying solely on this information do so entirely at their own risk. Any opinions expressed herein may
    not reflect the policies or opinions of DOP and OAD or any partners or funders.”

    “Information on safer drug use is presented as a public health service to help people make healthier choices to reduce the spread of HIV, viral hepatitis, and other infections. It is not intended to encourage or promote the use or possession of illegal drugs.”

    Ok awesome, thank you so much for watching. I hope to see you again next time!

    End of transcription.]

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