Radio Inspire

How To Learn Sign Language

Gestures 2 – Common non-verbal communication actions in English – Actions you do with your hands


Hi, everyone. In this video, we’re going to
talk about some more gestures. Extra English Practice A gesture is something that you do with
your hands or your body, some kind of nonverbal communication that adds to what you’re saying but also contains meaning in itself. In another video we’ve talked about some, five, common gestures, and now we’re going to talk about five more that you’ll do, all of them, with your hands. mm-hmm Number one The first one is what we call air quotes. It looks like that. So you put your two fingers up and you tap them a couple times. This one is used to mean that you’re being sarcastic or maybe you’re exaggerating or pretending a little, but most often it’s used to be sarcastic.
Yeah. So you’re kind of teasing somebody. Here are some examples. Hey, Larissa. Wasn’t that potluck on the weekend awesome? Oh, the food was amazing! It was so good. Did you try Susan’s meatballs? Yeah, I did. I loved them so much I asked her for the recipe, but she wouldn’t give it to me. She said that it it was “too complicated”. Oh my gosh. She just doesn’t want you to have it. I think so. Hey. Larissa? Yeah? This weekend you should come with me to my friend Tom’s “art gallery”. “Art gallery”? Yeah, well, it’s just like a
cafe where he hung up some of his work, it’s not really a gallery. Ah, well. But I think it’ll be cool. Sure, let’s go. Great. The second gesture we’re calling money
fingers, and it goes like this. So for this gesture, you take your four fingers and your thumb and kind of rub them together. And it means something is very expensive, it costs way too much. mm-hmm Here are some examples. Hey, Larissa. Mm hmm? What are you up to this weekend? Well the kids want me to take them to the amusement park, but…. Yeah. I don’t think we’re gonna go. Have you seen that new store downtown, Misha? Oh, yeah, the clothes are beautiful, but ….. The next one we’re going to call anticipation hands. Anticipation means you’re looking forward to something. So this is a gesture that looks like this. I want to do it. You rub your hands together and you put them close to your face. It means you’re looking forward to or excited about something. We often use this gesture in reference to food ,but not always. Here are some examples. Mmmm, Larissa, what’s that smell? Oh, I’m baking a cake, it’s in the oven. Can we have some when we’re done work? Yes! Hey, do you know there’s a new episode of our favorite show tomorrow? Oh, right! Oh, I’m so excited! I think we’ll
finally find out what happened to Diane! Our next gesture is crossed fingers. It looks like this. So you cross your fingers like this, and we often say fingers crossed while we do it, and it just means you’re hoping for something. You’re hoping for a good luck or for a positive result. Mm-hmm. Fingers crossed! Fingers crossed! Here are some examples. Larissa, why do you look nervous? I have my driver’s test in one hour. I’m so nervous about it! Oh my god. Wish me luck! Yeah, good luck! Misha. Mm hmm? Is it your sister’s wedding this weekend? Yeah, it is. How exciting! I know we’re all really excited! But it’s an outdoor wedding and they’re calling for rain, so we’re all just hoping that doesn’t happen. Fingers crossed! Our last gesture is called raise the roof, and it looks like this — you just put your palms, your hands, palm up, and you put them up and down a couple times. And we do this gesture either sort of as a celebration or if we’re talking about partying or we’re at a party. It’s kind of a party gesture. It often comes with a noise. It goes like this: woo woo! Here are some examples. Misha, are you going to Julia’s party on the weekend? Yeah, I’m so excited! It’s gonna be great. Uh huh. Woo woo! Larissa, it’s almost summer break. I know. I’m so excited! So these are five gestures that are common in our culture. Try them out or look for them when you’re talking to English speakers. And, as always, we are really interested to hear about what’s commonly used in your
culture. So if there are gestures that are different or that we don’t have in our culture, tell us about them in the comments below. We’d love to hear about it! Please share and subscribe with all your friends, and watch more videos at extraenglishpractice.com We’ll try to…. Hey, I’m so excited! I’ll be quiet, yeah. Close your mouth, Larissa. Okay, let’s get to work! Oh my god!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *