Radio Inspire

How To Learn Sign Language

ASL Project


[Tyler] Hi, my name is Tyler Stoeckel
[Pam] Hi, my name is Pamela Pitts [Tyler] Welcome to this video! We want to
provide you with instructions of teachers in the classroom working with an American
Sign Language Interpreter. As well as working with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing students in
the classroom. We hope you enjoy this video! [Tyler] alright, we are going to jump right
in our first tip in the classroom. First tip for teachers teaching in a classroom, is to
make sure that you are not pacing in front of the interpreter. This will block the line
of sight for the student causing information to be missed. Make sure that you are not pacing
in front of the interpreter in the classroom. [Tyler] Alright now, we are going to jump
into our next tip, Tip number two! The next tip is for teachers writing on the board.
If you are instructing the class about a mathematical problem. You want make sure that you are facing
the class when instructing. If you go back here to the board and you write 2 x 2 and
you are talking to the board. The student can’t read the lips, and the rest of the class
cannot hear everything. This is just universal design in the classroom to make sure that
everyone is able to hear all and any information. [Tyler] Alright, lets jump into tip number
three! Pam here is an interpreter for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing student in the classroom.
You are the teacher for a Chemistry class. In a chemistry class, there are a lot of elements
to be talked about. Like the periodic table, and different elements that is involved in
chemistry. It is important that me as a teacher, talk to Pam before the class starts to explain
the subject that I am talking about today. This gives Pam a chance to talk to the student
before the class begins to make sure that all information is transparent and clear for
the student. This is vital for the student success in the class and for the interpreter
to maintain clear, transparent communication. [Tyler] Onto tip number four! This topic is
really important. For a teacher working with an American Sign Language interpreter in the
classroom. The pace of speaking from a teacher! If I am talking too fast, Pam might not catch
everything costing the student not to catch everything as well. We want to make sure that
you are talking at a normal pace, with frequent pauses and breaks to give the interpreter
a chance to catch up, and the student a chance to catch every single information that is
being taught. [Tyler] Welcome back to tip number five in
the classroom! We want to make sure if you are lecturing in the classroom that you are
mindful of several different complications. As a teacher you may decide to use PowerPoint
slides, or a video in the classroom. You want to make sure that you are able to share all
information about the videos, about the PowerPoint to ensure clear and transparent transmission
to the student. So here is a tip for that. If you are showing a PowerPoint in the classroom.
Print off the PowerPoint slides for the student and the interpreter. They can look back at
the notes to make sure that they didn’t miss any information. If you are showing a video
in the classroom. You want to make sure that the video has Closed Captions. If you have
trouble with closed captions, see the library they might be able to find a version that
does have closed captions or talk to the disability resources center.
[Tyler] Welcome back to our last and final tip. Lets say that the teacher is talking
to a Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing student in the classroom. You as a teacher want to make sure
that when you are talking to the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing student that you are focusing
on them and letting your lips be clear for the student to read them. If you are talking
to the student, you want to make sure that you are not talking to the interpreter. That
cause the student to not being able to read your lips. Cause all information to be missed
that is being said.

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