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12 DAILY Activities to PERFECT your English Communication Skills Every Day


(upbeat music) – Hello everyone, and welcome
back to English With Lucy. Today, I am going to help you with your daily English practise. The best way to learn a language is to practise it every single day. Today, I’m going to talk to
you about 12 really fun ways of involving English
in your everyday life, so that you can practise. Take a handful, or maybe
just a couple of these ideas, put them into practise, and
watch your language skills transform in front of your eyes. These ideas work for any language, so it doesn’t just have to be English. Let’s get started with the lesson. Number one, my first idea, is try following chefs or
recipes in the language that you’re trying to learn. Now, when you learn a new language, it’s really good to learn
about their culture. It will help you a lot. And you can learn so much
through their cuisine, and their diet, and their eating habits. Maybe you can have a week
of dinners from the culture of the language that
you’re trying to learn. You could get together with friends who are also learning that language, and choose to only speak that
language at the dinner table as you eat this foreign food. There are so many opportunities for practising your language skills. Reading the recipe, going to the shops and choosing the food, maybe watching a chef
in action on YouTube. I know a lot of you are learning English, and there are some absolutely amazing British chefs on YouTube. You can look at Nigella Lawson
if you like the RP accent, and a female voice. Nigella Lawson has the
most attractive voice, and the most beautiful accent. I highly recommend you
watch some of her videos. You’ve also got Sorted Food. Those are four guys, they’re
very nice people, actually. I have met them. They do some really great recipe videos. There’s also Jamie Oliver. He’s a little bit more cockney. And then you’ve got Gordon Ramsey, if you like someone shouting at you. (laughing) Tip number two is take a
daily language challenge. This part of the video
is sponsored by Lingoda, but I’m going to give you
highly relevant information that will help you improve
your language skills on a daily basis. This video is about fun little activities, and things that you
can do on a daily basis to improve your language skills. Five minutes on a language app each day will help you improve, but it’s not enough on its
own to make a huge impact. Weekly lessons at a walk in
language school will also help, but you might find that your
progress is very, very slow. The Lingoda Language
Marathon is the perfect way to study every day, and make
a huge impact on your fluency. You may have heard me mention the Lingoda Language Marathon before, but this is the last ever Lingoda Language Marathon promotion. If you don’t know, what is it? (chuckling) Well, it’s basically a really motivating language study challenge. You study every day, unless
you take the half marathon, where you study slightly less, and if you complete the
marathon, you get a 100% refund, or a 50% refund if you
do the half marathon. More than 15 thousand people have participated in the
Lingoda Language Marathon over the past few years. For many, it’s transformed their lives, helping them to study,
or work in a new country. Many of them have shared their
life changing experiences with Ligoda, and you can
see that on their website, which is linked down below. I’d also encourage you to check
out their Instagram profile, where you can see more inspiring stories. The marathon starts on the
23rd of September, 2019, and ends on the 21st of December, 2019. You have to participate in an
agreed number of group classes each month in order to succeed. That’s 30 classes for the full marathon, and 15 classes for the half marathon. You can only take one
class per day, every day. You can join the marathon
in English, French, German, Spanish, and Business English, and there are classes for every level, beginner to advanced. So, how do you participate? You need to sign up to the marathon before the 9th of September. After registering for the marathon, and paying your non-refundable
entry fee, which is 49 euros, this secures your spot in the marathon, you automatically sign up for
a three month subscription. The entry fee will be taken off your first month in the marathon. I have a special discount code for you. You can get 10 euros off your entry fee by clicking on the link
in the description box, and using my code TALK5. Don’t forget, Lingoda will
refund your tuition fee in full if you attend an agreed amount of classes within each marathon month. You will need to show up
on time for the classes that you booked, and you’ll need to actively participate. If you book a class and miss it, or fail to book a class at all, you’ll still be able to
continue taking the classes, but you will no longer
qualify for the refund. Remember, places in the
marathon are limited. Reserve your spot in
advance to avoid missing the last ever marathon promotion. You absolutely must make sure that you check the terms and conditions to familiarise yourself with the rules. Previous marathon graduates have said that this is the key
to getting the refund. The marathon is an incredible opportunity to take your language
skills to the next level quickly and effectively. So many students would jump at the chance to take an English class with
a native qualified teacher every day for three months. And the fact that you
can get your money back as an extra motivational incentive
is the icing on the cake. Alternatively, if you don’t think that the marathon’s for you,
you can check out Lingoda’s other flexible subscription packages. Good luck to everyone who chooses to participate
in the marathon. Number three. This might surprise some people, but I am a massive fan of Reddit, and I think it’s a fantastic
language learning tool, especially if you want to learn English. Reddit is a huge forum. It’s basically a network of communities that are based on people’s interests. These little communities
are called subreddits. You can find communities, subreddits, that you’re interested in,
and then you can participate. But something I’ve noticed about Reddit is that generally, the
level of vocabulary, and grammar, and writing in
general, seems to be quite high. If you compare the people on Reddit to the people on Facebook, it seems that they’re much more willing to communicate with you, to
correct you, to debate with you, there’s a lot more high
quality interaction. There’s also lots of funny
content, lots of news content, lots of memes, (chuckling)
lots of cute content. I like to share pictures
of my dog on Reddit. I really recommend that you visit Reddit, you find some subreddits
that you’re interested in, in the language that
you’re trying to learn, probably English, but there are lots of subreddits
in other languages as well. There are subreddits for
sport, cooking, politics, debating, creative writing, everything. I recommend that you
visit Reddit once a day, and make a post, or make a
comment every single day, and start to interact
with other native people. I warn you, it’s addictive, and you will probably fall in
love with Reddit like I have, and like Will has. (laughing) Number four is eat in
authentic restaurants, but there’s a special way of doing this if you’re trying to learn a language. You need to warn the staff that you would like to do
everything in that language, and you need to let them
know that you’re learning, you want to improve, and it’s highly likely
if it’s not too busy, that they will want to help you, especially if they speak
that language themselves, if they are from that country. I used to do this all the time in London. There was a Spanish restaurant near me, and I used to go there with my friend who also was learning Spanish, and we used to say, “Would you mind if we did
everything in Spanish today? “Just pretend we’re in Spain.” And the waiters absolutely loved it, ’cause they felt like
they were in Spain too. I think they were also quite flattered that English people were
trying to learn their language, because obviously, they
had come to England to learn our language. So, it was quite a nice exchange. Look around you, see if
there’s an Irish pub, or some sort of British restaurant, or if you’re learning
French, a French restaurant, et cetera, et cetera, and you can make a
really fun evening of it. Obviously, it’s best to
have a partner in crime that’s also learning that language, but you could always
as your dinner partner, do you mind if we do this
in a foreign language? I’d just really like the
opportunity to practise. Number five, great for daily practise, is set all of your electronic devices, so, I’m talking your TV,
your phone, your iPad, your laptop, anything you can think of, your Alexa, your Google Home
thingy, your Google Home. (laughing) Set it into the language
that you’re learning. Ask Alexa or Google in the
morning what the weather’s like, and they will tell you in the
language that you’re learning. Find out random tech vocabulary
by switching your computer, and then having to deal
with a huge problem in a foreign language. (laughing) Okay, maybe that isn’t
everyone’s idea of a good time, but I did that when I
was learning Spanish, and it just made me feel confident that I was doing
everything I possibly could to immerse myself in Spanish. Number six. This one relates to video games. If you like to play video
games, if you’re a gamer, and if you play online multiplayer games, choose a foreign server. A server where people are from the country of the language that you’re learning. I’ve said this before. People playing video
games can be very helpful. You can form very nice friendships, and a lot of the best
English students that I had, with the best pronunciation,
and the strangest vocabulary, had learnt all of that from gaming. They formed long lasting
friendships with natives, and practised with them on a daily basis, and it was fun. Make sure that you
don’t accidentally learn loads of swear words, though. (laughing) Number seven is quite
a cool idea, actually. It is shop in foreign supermarkets. You don’t necessarily
have to buy anything, but this is especially good if you’re learning a
language like Chinese, or maybe Polish, or maybe Arabic. Languages where they have
a very specific diet, or they eat very specific foods, and there is a lot of
immigration into your country, and so they have their own supermarkets. There are loads or oriental supermarkets, and Arabic supermarkets, and Polish sections in
supermarkets in the UK. I imagine there are in your country. I remember in Spain there were loads of oriental supermarkets. Just go there, if you’re
learning one of those languages, go there, have a browse,
bring a translator, or a dictionary with you, and see what new
vocabulary you can pick up. Okay, you might not want to
do this on a daily basis, but maybe you could do it once a week, and make a meal from the ingredients that you pick up once a week. That links with my first tip or idea, which is following recipes and
chefs in the native language. Number eight. This is more expensive, and
not necessarily a daily, but it is make your next
holiday a language course. This is something that I
did when I was younger, and it helped me so much. Instead of going on holiday, I used to go on language courses. All of my friends went on
girl’s holidays to Ibiza, and Greece, and party holidays. (chuckling) I’m not trying to be super
different or anything. For the price of the one week holiday that my girlfriends went on, I managed to book three
weeks immersion in Italy. I just stayed in a room in a
flat of an Italian woman there, I booked really cheap
flights with Ryanair, and I did a half day language
course every single day, which is why it kind of
relates to learn every day. Oh my god, the amount of Italian I learnt in those three
weeks was incredible, and the reason it really
relates to learning, and doing something fun every day, is because I met so many people out there that I kept in touch with on WhatsApp. And chatting to a foreign
friend in their native language on WhatsApp every day is an amazing way of improving your language skills, and even better, if you
do it via voice notes, they give you a little bit of time to think about what you’re saying, or you can correct yourself, and when they reply to you, you can listen to what
they’ve said multiple times, and repeat bits. So, it’s a really, really good way of familiarising yourself
with the pronunciation, and the language. Now, obviously, you
have to have the funds, but it’s something you could
really, really work towards. I remember one year, it was my Christmas and
birthday present joint from my parents to do a one
week language course in Spain. They thought I was mad, but I think they were also kind of proud that’s what I wanted instead of an iPhone. I was just obsessed with
Spain and languages. I really, really just wanted to go. Number nine is fun, especially if you have
quite a specific interest. It’s read blogs in another language. And the reason why this is
so good is because blogs, as opposed to news articles,
and other documents online, are normally written in
quite a colloquial fashion. The blogger writes as if they are just talking
to a friend, normally. This is a fantastic opportunity to pick up colloquial
phrases, slang phrases, the way a native speaker would
naturally talk and write. And the best part, it’s
something you’re interested in, or it’s written by a
person that you admire, and that you like. Number 10. Read a translation of your favourite book. I always mention this, and
it’s amazing how many people haven’t thought of doing this. Choose a book that you’ve already read, and read it in the language
that you’re learning. It’s much easier than just
picking up a new book, ’cause you understand
the general storyline, and you can pick up new vocabulary without having to actively
search for it in a dictionary. I did this with Harry Potter in Spanish, and it took me a little bit longer, but it felt really, really satisfying, ’cause I was learning new words without having to translate them. It also really helped me
with my sentence structure, and also my storytelling. Number 11. Quite a simple one, but follow native
speakers on social media. Social media is normally
seen as a huge distraction. When you’re using it, you’re wasting time, but what happens if when
you go on Instagram, it’s just filled with
speakers of the language that you are learning. All of their captions
are in that language, all of their stories are in that language. The same on Facebook, the same on YouTube. If you’re looking at social media, and it’s all in the language
that you’re learning, well, you’re still immersing yourself, you’ll still be picking things up. Again, you can tailor
it to your interests, check it every day, it’s
suddenly a language activity that you do on a daily basis, and it will help you improve, and it will help you sound more natural, and develop natural,
organic English skills, or other language skills. And the last one, number
12, this isn’t for everyone, but it’s a great idea, and it’s something I’ve done in the past, it’s start a private blog or diary in the language that you’re learning. Okay, it doesn’t necessarily
have to be private. Mine was 100% private, and
I just wrote about my day in the language that I was learning. I never got anyone to correct that, because I didn’t want them
to see what I was writing. But for me, it was really
interesting to go back over time, and look at how my language
skills had developed, and see how I chose to express
certain things and feelings when my language skills
weren’t up to scratch. Writing down these feelings
in another language made it much easier to
express these feelings in another language when it came to it. Right, those are my 12 ideas for improving your language
skills on a daily basis. If you have any more recommendations, please comment them down below. I’m sure there are loads more fun ways of improving your skills. If you are interesting in joining the last ever Lingoda
Language Marathon promotion, then click on the link
in the description box, and use my code TALK5
for a 10 euro discount on your entry fee. Don’t forget to connect with
me on all of my social media. I’ve got my Facebook,
I’ve got my Instagram, I’ve got my Twitter, and I’ve got my new
Lucy Bella Earl channel. The video that will be going up, or might have already gone up, is about my stupidest financial mistakes that I made in my 20s. Very interesting. If you want to laugh
at me and my stupidity, check that out, it’s linked down below. I will see you soon for another lesson. (kissing sound) Pick a handful, or maybe
just a couple of these ideas, put them into practise, and watch your language skills evolve. Evolve, (laughing) evolve! What is this Pokemon? (laughing) Now, when you learn a new, a no. (laughing) Now when you nearn, nearn, nearn. I must say her voice is
incredibly attractive. It’s gorgeous! (chuckling) (blowing air) Nigella Lawson making me
hot, a sweaty upper lip. I hope my makeup’s still on. If not, that would be embarrassing. (chuckling) After registering for the marathon, and paying your non-dispunsable. (chuckling) I think they were also quite flat. Oh, just hit 10 thousand
steps by gesticulating. (light upbeat music) (energetic upbeat music)

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